‘Qissa’ wins top Asian honour at TIFF

Share this article
Qissa’ won the NETPAC
Award for World or International
Asian Film Premiered at
the 2013 Toronto International
Film Festival (TIFF). The award
was announced at a brunch reception
at the Toronto Intercontinental
Centre. The Punjabi film
directed by Anup Singh is set
amidst the partition of India following
independence in 1947.
Cameron Bailey artistic director
of TIFF describes the
film as a wonderful piece of art
set inside a historically significant
moment in South Asia.
“Beautiful, timeless, and touching
the deepest of human impulses,
Qissa carries the spirit of
a great folk tale. Although it’s set
in a particular time and place – the
Punjab region that straddles India
and Pakistan in the years immediately
after partition – it is both
deeper and broader than any one
moment. As this eerie family drama
progresses, it cuts to the heart
of eternal desires for honour, empathy,
and love,” he writes.
He also pays tribute to the lead
actor Irfran Khan, a naturally gifted
artist, claimed as India’s best
actor. Khan was also in Toronto
festival for the film The Lunchbox.
Actor Ifran Khan at TIFF. (Picture by Mahesh Abeyewardene)

Actor Ifran Khan at TIFF. (Picture by Mahesh Abeyewardene)

Qissa’ won the NETPAC Award for World or International Asian Film Premiered at the 2013 Toronto International
Film Festival (TIFF). The award was announced at a brunch reception at the Toronto Intercontinental Centre. The Punjabi film directed by Anup Singh is set amidst the partition of India following independence in 1947.
Cameron Bailey artistic director of TIFF describes the film as a wonderful piece of art set inside a historically significant moment in South Asia.

“Beautiful, timeless, and touching the deepest of human impulses, Qissa carries the spirit of a great folk tale. Although it’s set in a particular time and place – the Punjab region that straddles India and Pakistan in the years immediately after partition – it is both deeper and broader than any one moment. As this eerie family drama progresses, it cuts to the heart
of eternal desires for honour, empathy, and love,” he writes.

He also pays tribute to the lead actor Irfran Khan, a naturally gifted artist, claimed as India’s best actor. Khan was also in Toronto festival for the film The Lunchbox.